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Dear Editor: To World Cup football fans, when in Qatar, do as the Qataris do!

“[…] Former president of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, Noor Hassanali was a member of the Muslim faith. It was widely known that no alcoholic beverages were served at the official residence of the President when he was in office and he was the head of state for ten long years: 1987 – 1997.

“I am sure that people who were accustomed to having a drink or two when attending functions at the President’s house may have been dispirited by the sudden change, but everyone adapted and had to abide by the rules of the President’s house…”

The following Letter to the Editor on the cultural restrictions placed on football fans at the 2022 Qatar World Cup was submitted to Wired868 by Roger Mohammed of Oropune:

Football fans at a stadium in Qatar.

The phrase “When in Rome, do as the Romans do” originated sometime in the 4th century when a Christian saint, St Augustine from Rome, relocated to another place called Milan—where Christians did not observe the Sabbath on Saturdays, as St Augustine was accustomed to in Rome.

St Augustine seemed taken aback by this but a Bishop from Milan named St Ambrose gave him some sound advice when he said: “Whenever I go to Rome I fast on Saturdays but when I’m home I do not. So, you should abide by the tradition of whatever church you attend.”

KFC Munch Pack

There are strong objections from several quarters about the stringent rules laid down by Qatar for this year’s World Cup. Qatar is a Muslim state which frowns on homosexuality and the consumption of alcohol.

Thus, gays who are visiting Qatar for the World Cup have been warned to desist from flaunting their affection in public. A decision has also been made to ban the sale of alcohol at the various stadia where the World Cup games are being played.

Fifa president Gianni Infantino (right) has defended Qatar’s behaviour as the 2022 World Cup host.
[…] It is confusing to me that so many people are perturbed by the Qatari rules when the world knows that Islamic states do not condone these lifestyles. Yet, in 2010, Fifa awarded Qatar the rights to host the 2022 World Cup.

Did Fifa expect Qatar to suspend their customs and beliefs for the duration of the World Cup?

Former president of the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago, Noor Hassanali was a member of the Muslim faith. It was widely known that no alcoholic beverages were served at the official residence of the President when he was in office and he was the head of state for ten long years: 1987 – 1997.

I am sure that people who were accustomed to having a drink or two when attending functions at the President’s house may have been dispirited by the sudden change, but everyone adapted and had to abide by the rules of the President’s house.

In response to Qatar’s decision to prohibit the sale of alcohol at World Cup games, FIFA president, Gianni Infantino said: “If you cannot drink a beer for three hours a day, you will survive.”

Former Trinidad and Tobago president Noor Hassanali.
(Copyright Office of the President)

I totally agree with Mr Infantino. When fans return to their hotel rooms they can do whatever they wish but I strongly submit that the state of Qatar should be respected.

If the rules Qatar has laid down are found to be unreasonable, then they should not have been awarded the hosting of the 2022 World Cup. But for now, when in Qatar, do as the Qataris do.

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4 comments

  1. One thing wrong with this article. They agreed to have alcohol at the stadiums and reneged on this agreement two days before the first game.

    • Qatar has 300’000 citizens. If they can host a World Cup then so can TT lol, and in TT is Rum, music, sexy woman amd everything. The western fans would have enjoyed themselves propper.

      • Lasana Liburd

        Qatar spent US$220 billion on the World Cup–not counting bribes. I don’t think we can afford it. 🙁

        • JAW might be willing to pay more than that to avoid extradition.

          The issue is not whether we can afford it but whether it’s something we should aspire to afford.

          And consider this before you decide:
          When Hadad and company done with we tail, I cyar see we making a World Cup Finals again except as hosts.