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CWI honours late Sir Everton Weekes: a Founding Father of West Indies Cricket Excellence

“[…] In his career, Sir Everton played 48 Test matches and made 4,455 runs at an average of 58.61 per innings. This included a world record five consecutive centuries in 1948: scores of 141 against England in Jamaica, followed by scores of 128, 194, 162 and 101 in India.

“In his next innings, he made 90…”

The Cricket West Indies (CWI) pays tribute to iconic West Indies batsman Sir Everton Weekes, who died today at 95:

Photo: West Indies cricket legend Sir Everton Weekes.
(via CWI)

Cricket West Indies (CWI) today paid tribute to Sir Everton Weekes, the legendary West Indies batsman and pioneer. Sir Everton was one of the most significant figures in the history of the sport—as a batsman of the highest quality, he played alongside other forefathers of West Indies cricket for a decade at the international level.

He was part of the famous Three Ws, alongside Sir Frank Worrell and Sir Clyde Walcott. He was also a highly respected coach, a knowledgeable analyst on the game  for the regional and international media, as well as a former team manager, match referee for the International Cricket Council, and a member of the ICC Hall of Fame.

He passed away on Wednesday at the age of 95.

Ricky Skerritt, President of CWI said: “On behalf of CWI I want to publicly express our deepest sympathy to the family of this remarkable Iconic sportsman and gentleman, who passed away earlier today. I also send condolences to former CWI President Sir Wes Hall, and his family, who were all extremely close to Sir Everton.

“I never had the opportunity to see Sir Everton bat, but I had the opportunity to get to know him a little in his later years. I learned about his incredible career by reading about him and looking at old videos when I could. His performance stats were excellent as he set tremendously high standards for his time.

Photo: West Indies cricketer Everton Weekes on 28 April 1950.
(Copyright Douglas Miller/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

“Sir Everton was therefore a most amazing pioneer in West Indies cricket; a gentleman and quite simply a wonderful human being. I got to spend a couple hours with him last year just sitting at his home and talking with him, at a time when he was recovering from a serious illness.

“I have never known a more humble and gentle human being. I grew to appreciate his sense of humour and his love of people, and witnessed the love and respect that so many held for him in Barbados and across the entire region.

“I am so privileged to have known this amazing West Indian Legend and gentleman. Sir Everton Weekes was truly one of the founding fathers of West Indies cricket excellence. May his soul rest in eternal peace.”

Born, Everton DeCourcey Weekes, he was a member of the famous Empire Club in Barbados, which was also home to several other legends of the game including Sir Frank Worrell, Sir Charlie Griffith and Sir Conrad Hunte.

He made his Test debut at age 22 against England at Kensington Oval in 1948 under the captaincy of George Headley. His final match was against Pakistan in Trinidad, a decade later.

Photo: Iconic West Indies batsman Sir Everton Weekes on the go.

In his career, Sir Everton played 48 Test matches and made 4,455 runs at an average of 58.61 per innings. This included a world record five consecutive centuries in 1948: scores of 141 against England in Jamaica, followed by scores of 128, 194, 162 and 101 in India. In his next innings, he made 90.

His average of 58.61 runs means Sir Everton is one of two West Indies greats—along with George Headley—in the top 10 Test averages of all time. This average has been bettered by only four players in history to have scored more than 4,000 runs.

In all first-class cricket he played 152 matches and scored 12010 runs at an average of 55.34 with a top score of 304 not out.

To see Sir Everton’s career history for Barbados and the West Indies, click HERE to see his profile page.

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2 comments

  1. Earl Best

    It is not really surprising to me that the Board’s release got his middle name wrong; it’s DeCourcy, not DeCourcey.

    Years ago, on a TSTT phone card featuring the Three W’s, “legends in the glorious history of West Indies cricket,” his name appeared as Eveton weeks.

    Two items of interest that leap out at one where Sir Everton is concerned:

    (1) In his 48 Test innings which produced almost 4,500 runs, he hit TWO sixes–in consecutive matches in 1955.

    (2) In the innings against India which followed his five successive Test centuries, he was RUN OUT for 90

  2. Earl Best

    Tony Cozier was no Lance Gibbs, Sonny Ramadhin or Alf Valentine but I am willing to bet that he is turning like nothing in his grave this evening. Why? A West Indies cricket legend dies at age 95 and this is the best the Board can do the best the President can do? A board, mind you, that employs a full-time communication staff!

    Gary Sobers, 84 next month, is going to read this, shudder and tell himself that he is going to have to make yet another century if he is to get his due…

    …and even then…