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Contributors

  • Afra Raymond

    Afra Raymond is a Chartered Surveyor and Managing Director of Raymond & Pierre Ltd. He is the ex-president of Institute of Surveyors and immediate past president of the Joint Consultative Council for the Construction Industry (JCC), having served between December 2010 and November 2015.
  • Afryea Charles

    Afryea Charles is an inspired missionary who has renounced the pleasures of everyday living because she wants to save the world. As time passes, she is less and less certain that yes, she can. But she is not yet ready to concede that she may have bitten off more than she can chew.
  • Akilah Holder

    Akilah Holder

    Akilah Holder is a former college lecturer and journalist whose strong convictions often win her enemies, which does not faze her. She lives by the mantra ‘ignore the ignorant,’ has already published one book and has her own blog at https://intelligenttalk.wordpress.com/
  • Akins Vidale

    Akins Vidale

    Akins Vidale lectures at the Cipriani College of Labour and Cooperative Studies and is a UWI graduate with a B.A. in History. He has served as the president of the Trinidad Youth Council and is the General Secretary of the Federation of Independent Trade Unions and NGOs (FITUN). Read his blog: http://akinsvidale.wordpress.com/
  • Allan Powder

    Allan Powder

    Allan Powder is an avid writer currently pursuing his BA in Mass Communications at COSTAATT. He is employed as an IT professional at Republic Bank Limited, and is a freelancer at Wired868. Powder is also a certified photographer.
  • Allan V. Crane

    Allan V. Crane

    Allan V. Crane is a freelance photographer.
  • Amiel Mohammed

    Amiel Mohammed

    Amiel Mohammed is a sports enthusiast and has worked in communications for Central FC and the Women's Premier League TT. He has also pioneered numerous projects geared towards creating opportunities for the differently abled such as the Differently-Abled Football Camp 2015 and Focus Football Coaching Academy.
  • Andrew Friday

    Andrew Friday

    Andrew “Fries” Friday is an actor, comedian, impressionist, live event host and broadcaster. He launched his performing career at Presentation College, San F'do (1991-98) and featured in over a dozen plays and films. He had guest roles in Contract Killers (2007) and Girlfriends Getaway (2014) and is currently working on The Longest Wait.
  • Andrew Jennings

    Andrew Jennings

    Andrew Jennings has been chasing 'bad men' around the world for more than three decades. His book, The Lords of the Rings, on Olympic corruption and the fascist background of the IOC president was named by Sports Illustrated as one of the Top One Hundred Sports Books of all Time. His last book on FIFA corruption, Foul!, is now in 15 languages despite an attempt by Herr Blatter using FIFA funds in Switzerland to persuade a Zurich court to impose a global ban.
  • Arnold Corneal

    Arnold Corneal

    Arnold Corneal is the former corporate communications manager at Petrotrin and communications advisor to late President ANR Robinson. He holds an English FA international coaching badge and is the son of former national player and coach Alvin Corneal and brother of ex-TTFA technical director Anton Corneal. He was a former ASL goalkeeper.
  • Asha Edwards

    Asha Edwards

    Asha Edwards is a final year student at COSTAATT pursuing her BA in Mass Communications and currently an intern at Wired868. She enjoys learning and spending time with her family, especially her niece and two nephews. Asha believes that God helps those who help themselves and so she continues to work hard to achieve her goals.
  • Ashford Jackman

    Ashford Jackman was the sports editor at TTT/NBN between 1982 and 2004, and did live commentary on and reported on all the Strike Squad matches. He has also written on football for Tapia and the Trinidad and Tobago Review.
  • BC Pires

    BC Pires

    BC Pires is a veteran columnist and satirist of extensive experience in Trinidad and Tobago and abroad. You can read more of his columns at: http://bcpires.com
  • Brendon Julien

    Brendon Julien

    Brendon Julien is an intern with Wired868 who is passionate about journalism. Julien will soon be completing his BA in Mass Communication at COSTAATT.
  • Brent Sancho

    Brent Sancho

    Brent Sancho is the Minister of Sport and a UNC Senator. He is also the former CEO of Pro League football club, Central FC. He made 42 international appearances for the Trinidad and Tobago national football team, including three at the Germany 2006 World Cup.
  • Brian Harry

    Brian Harry

    Brian Harry is a former CEO of TIDCO, who now lives and works in Texas. He is a consultant whose areas of specialisation include corporate development and strategy and organizational development, in the Energy, Hospitality and Financial Services Sectors.
  • Bryan St Louis

    Bryan St Louis is the education officer for the Communication Workers’ Union (CWU).
  • CAISO Trinidad and Tobago

    CAISO Trinidad and Tobago

    CAISO is the Coalition Advocating for Inclusion of Sexual Orientation, which includes both GLBT people and allies. Our aims are: to foster a forward-thinking, visionary and humane approach to sexual orientation and gender identity; to secure full inclusion in all aspects of national life, social policy and citizenship regardless to sexuality and gender; to develop capacity, leadership and self-pride in our own communities, and to mobilise an advocacy movement for social justice in partnership with others.
  • Camaleena Ajodha

    Camaleena Ajodha

    Camaleena Ajodha is currently pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in Mass Communication at COSTAATT. She is passionate about family, nature, travel, photography, reading and loves to meet new people.
  • Candice Dennis

    Candice Dennis

    Candice Dennis is Wired868 intern who is presently pursuing her BA in Mass Communications at COSTATT. Dennis is also a proud mom to her three year old daughter.
  • Candis Cayona

    Candis Cayona

    Candis Cayona is a certified Events Planner and Administrator, a Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communications student at COSTAATT, and a wife and a mother. Cayona believes in always being open to learning because it inspires growth.
  • Carla Procope

    Carla Procope

    Carla Procope is currently in her final year at COSTAATT pursuing her Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communications and a Wired868 intern. She is a working mother in the insurance industry for over 15 years. Procope enjoys working with and helping people, and follows the principle that action is the key to success.
  • Carla Questelles

    Carla Questelles

    Carla Questelles is pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in Mass Communication at COSTAATT and is currently a Wired868 intern. Questelles is passionate about her family, loves travelling, cooking and baking, listening to music, dancing, going to the movies and meeting new people.
  • Carlotta Rivas

    Carlotta Rivas

    Carlotta Germine Rivas is in her final year at COSTATT, pursuing her BA in Mass Communications and works in the Customer Service Department at Sagicor. She is also presently an intern at Wired868. Rivas is passionate about people and spends most of her spare time working on various NGO boards in the service of others.
  • Carol Kolahal

    Carol Kolahal

    Carol Kolahal works for the Elections and Boundaries Commission whilst pursuing a BA in Mass Communications. Kolahal has a flair for writing, and an avid interest in photography and travelling. She is at present an intern at Wired868
  • Chanelle Seymour

    Chanelle Seymour

    Chanelle Seymour, a consistent advocate for artistic expression, is currently completing her BA in Mass Communication at COSTAATT and an intern at Wired868. She is adamant that the pursuit of tertiary level certification will not prevent her from maintaining an active professional, personal and family life and she continues to take an active interest in photography, music production and curation and travelling.
  • Christophe Brathwaite

    Christophe Brathwaite

    Christophe Brathwaite is an Attorney at Law who specializes in Corporate, Commercial, Sport and Entertainment Law
  • Cindy Howe

    Cindy Howe

    Cindy Howe is a child of the 80’s who grew up in Diamond Vale, Diego Martin via La Brea and competed in track and field events until her late twenties. She is a former banker and event coordinator and now a virtual assistant, wife and puppy-mummy. She resides in the US but her heart remains in Trinidad and Tobago.
  • Clarissa Pantin

    Clarissa Pantin

    Clarissa Pantin is a final year student at COSTAATT pursuing her BA in Mass Communications and is currently an intern at Wired868. Clarissa believes in maintaining her personal integrity at all times and her pet peeve is people who take advantage of others. Her advice to young persons is “do everything to the best of your ability, even if you don’t like doing it”. People are judged by their actions; choose what you want to be remembered for.
  • Claudius Fergus

    Claudius Fergus

    Claudius Fergus is a retired Senior Lecturer in the Department of History at UWI’s St Augustine Campus who specialises in the abolition of British colonial slavery and its transatlantic slave trade. His major work on the subject is Revolutionary Emancipation: Slavery and Abolitionism in the British West Indies (2013). He has other extensive publications in peer-reviewed journals and edited books.
  • Colin Benjamin

    Colin Benjamin is a former freelance writer for the Trinidad Newsday newspaper and Guyana Stabroek News.
  • Corey Gilkes

    Corey Gilkes is a self-taught history reader whose big mouth forever gets his little tail in trouble. He lives in La Romaine and is working on four book projects. He has a blog on https://coreygilkes.wordpress.com/blog/ and http://www.trinicenter.com/Gilkes/. Vitriol can be emailed to him at coreygks@gmail.com.
  • Crystal Guerra

    Crystal Guerra

    Crystal Guerra is in the final year of a Mass Communication degree at COSTAATT, where she is a part-time student. She works full-time with the Judiciary of Trinidad and Tobago and also chairs the Credit Committee of a credit union but still ensures that she makes time for family and faith. Her interests include journalism, children’s rights, history and theology and she is also passionate about research.
  • Crystal-lee Moses

    Crystal-lee Moses

    Crystal-lee Moses is currently a student at COSTAATT pursuing her BA in Mass Communication and a Wired868 intern. She is a family oriented person and is motivated by them to be successful in life. Moses believes that “sometimes God puts a Goliath in your life, for you to find the David within you.”
  • David Muhammad

    David Muhammad

    David Muhammad holds a double Major Bachelor’s degree from UWI in Sociology and Education. He is the Trinidad representative of the Nation of Islam, hosts a radio show on 91.9FM and is a motivational speaker. He is also the manager of the Trinidad and Tobago national football team.
  • David Nakhid

    David Nakhid

    David Nakhid is the founder and director of the David Nakhid International Football Academy in Beirut, Lebanon and was the first Trinidad and Tobago international to play professionally in Europe. The two-time Caribbean and T&T Player of the Year and cerebral midfielder once represented FC Grasshopper (Switzerland), Waregem (Belgium), POAK (Greece), New England Revolution (US), Al Emirates (UAE) and Al Ansar (Lebanon).
  • Dennise Demming

    Dennise Demming

    Dennise Demming is an Adjunct Faculty Member at UWI, Media and Communications Strategist, TEDxPOS organiser and co-licensee for TEDxPortofSpain and Chairman of the Board at TTTHTI. Dennise, who grew up in East POS, also has a Business MBA and B.Sc. in Political Science & Public Administration and Mass Communications from UWI.
  • Densill Theobald

    Densill Theobald

    Densill Theobald has represented the Trinidad and Tobago national senior team 99 times and has 97 full international caps with two goals. He is a Caledonia AIA player and previously represented Dempo (India), Ujpest (Hungary), Falkirk (Scotland), Toronto Olympians (Canada) and Joe Public.
  • Dominique Fernandes

    Dominique Fernandes

    Dominique Fernandes is pursuing her BA in Mass Communication at COSTAATT and is an intern at Wired868. Fernandes is passionate about communication and enjoys using it as a tool to learn about individuals from different backgrounds.
  • Dominique Webb

    Dominique Webb

    Dominique Webb is a Wired868 intern. More importantly, she is the proud parent of a two-year-old baby girl named Gabrielle George. At present, she is employed as a PR and Marketing Assistant at NALIS and is pursuing her BA in Mass Communications at COSTAATT.
  • Sheila Rampersad

    Sheila Rampersad

    Dr Sheila Rampersad is a member of the current MATT executive and the Women Working for Social Progress. She is a veteran columnist.
  • Dzuel Gittens

    Dzuel Gittens

    Dzuel Gittens is a graphic artist currently pursuing her Bachelor’s Degree in Mass Communication at COSTATT and a Wired868 intern. Gittens also who owns the Pine Vue Retirement Community.
  • Elizabeth Solomon

    Elizabeth Solomon

    Elizabeth Solomon is an award winning journalist, who has recently returned home after more than 15 years working on Human Rights and Conflict Prevention with the United Nations.
  • Embau Moheni

    Embau Moheni is the Deputy Political Leader of the National Joint Action Committee (NJAC) and Chairman of the National Action Cultural Committee (NACC). He is a former Minister in the Ministry of National Security under the People's Partnership Government. He was twice arrested as a teenager during the uprising of the early 1970s.
  • Eric St Bernard

    Eric St Bernard

    Eric A St Bernard is a mass media glutton and want-to-be calypso and soca activist. He holds a MSc in TV/Radio from Brooklyn College and has worked extensively, in Caribbean music formats in Trinidad & NYC, events promotions and media advertising.
  • Rhoda Bharath

    Rhoda Bharath

    Rhoda Bharath works as a lecturer by day and remains obsessed with politics by night. Follow her blog here: https://rhoda-bharath-jxtv.squarespace.com/
  • Everald Gally Cummings

    Everald Gally Cummings

    Everald "Gally" Cummings was coach of Trinidad and Tobago's famous 1989 team, which was known as the "Strike Squad", and was a key midfielder in the country's infamous 1973 World Cup qualifying campaign. He played professional in the United States and Mexico for over a decade and was inducted in the Trinidad and Tobago Sports Hall of Fame in 1989. He was also listed among the country's top 100 sportsmen and women of the last millennium by the Ministry of Sport.
  • Ewan Headley

    Ewan Headley is a Wired868 intern and a journalism student at COSTAATT.
  • Expression House Media

    Expression House Media

    Expression House Media Limited is a video production company that combines expertise and passion to produce innovative cinematography, editing and motion graphics.
  • Filbert Street

    Filbert Street

    Filbert Street is a real columnist who works in a fantasy world that sometimes resembles our own.
  • Fixin TT

    Fixin TT

    Fixin T&T's mission is the realization of good governance to achieve healthy, holistic, and fulfilling lifestyles for all citizens through the study, promotion, and furtherance of strong democratic institutions; sound infrastructure; integrity in public and corporate affairs; and a culture of respect by all for the laws and regulations of the country to create a safe, secure, efficient and productive Trinidad & Tobago.
  • Gabrielle Gellineau

    Gabrielle Gellineau

    Gabrielle Gellineau is a Lawyer, Consultant and Writer who has spent the last decade working in labour and other development fields throughout the Caribbean and internationally. She has most recently practiced her craft in the Industrial Court, at CARICOM and at State Enterprises in the entertainment, energy and health sectors. She currently manages her own practice with offices in San Juan and Port of Spain.
  • Gaiven Clairmont

    Gaiven Clairmont

    Gaiven Clairmont is an author who has published books of poetry, light short stories and a suspense novel. His last poetic, Voices From The Ghetto, was written in 2014 on the treatment of young black males in society and the people who live in impoverished urban communities.
  • Hannibal Najjar

    Hannibal Najjar

    Hannibal Najjar is a former Trinidad and Tobago national senior team and youth team coach. He considers himself a lifetime learner and advocate for the under-served and has been recognised for his contribution to sport and academia in T&T, Canada and the US. He is a guest speaker on race-relations and curriculum planning and is working on his first book.
  • Highway Re-Route Movement

    Highway Re-Route Movement

    The Highway Re-Route Movement is a lobby group that is firmly against the planned construction of the Debe to Mon Desir highway segment. This segment will cost the taxpayer over $5 billion, and will destroy over 350 homes and 13 communities.
  • Hillan Cadena Morean

    Hillan Cadena Morean

    Hillan Cadena Morean is an avid sport fan and the Managing Director of Cadena Sport Management Services. He believes in the power of sport and recreation for health, life lessons and developing homes, communities and countries.
  • Jabal Hassanali

    Jabal Hassanali is a semi-retired, Trini urban planner-cum-English teacher, who is currently stuck somewhere in Asia. He has made a career of being in-between countries and in-between jobs and sometimes, mainly in his in-between moments, fancies himself a writer.
  • Jabari Fraser

    Jabari Fraser

    Jabari Fraser is a journalist employed at CCN TV6. He is an executive member of MATT.
  • Jamaal Shabazz

    Jamaal Shabazz

    Jamaal Shabazz is the Guyana National Senior Team head coach, founder and technical director of Morvant Caledonia United and ex-head coach of the Trinidad and Tobago men's and women's senior teams. He helped steer T&T to second place at the 2012 Caribbean Cup, Guyana to an unprecedented 2014 World Cup qualifying semifinal berth and Caledonia to its first CFU Club Championship title in 2012. He is a member of the Jamaat-al-Muslimeen group that staged an unsuccessful coup in Trinidad in 1990.
  • Jens Sejer Andersen

    Jens Sejer Andersen

    Jens Sejer Andersen is the International Director of Play the Game and the Danish Institute for Sports Studies and a former Denmark Sports Journalist of the Year.
  • Jessica Joseph

    Jessica Joseph

    Jessica Joseph is currently the Creative Director of Accela Marketing St Lucia/Canada. She is a multiple ADDY Award Winning Trinidadian national, Pop Cultural Anthropologist and Humans Rights Activist. She blogs on Huffington Post and alieninthecaribbean.blogspot.com.
  • Julie Guyadeen

    Julie Guyadeen

    Julie Guyadeen has a BSc. in Government with a Minor in International Relations and Postgraduate training in International Relations both at the UWI St. Augustine Campus. She is a firm believer in civil society having an active voice.
  • Juliet Solomon

    Juliet Solomon

    Juliet Solomon is a globtrotting Trinidadian who now lives and writes in Peru. She is the official scorer and Cricket Women`s Officer for Cricket Peru (http://perucricket.com/) and an active member of the Good Companions Theatre Group. Her book about her experiences in Lima, “Yes…But It´s Different Here” is available on Amazon.com.
  • Keisha Saunders

    Keisha Saunders

    Keisha La Toya Saunders is a COSTAATT student pursuing her Bachelor of Arts Degree in Journalism/Mass Communication. She is also employed at RBC Royal Bank and presently a Wired868 intern. Saunders is motivated by her young daughter and mother to be successful in life and hopes to one day become a Communications Specialist.
  • Keita Demming

    Keita Demming

    Keita Demming holds a PhD from the University of Toronto. His podcast Disruptive Conversations is an effort to unpack how people who are working to disrupt a sector or system think. Dr Demming has worked internationally and in a variety of sectors within the field of social innovation. He also holds the license for TEDxPortofSpain.
  • Kelvin Jack

    Kelvin Jack

    Kelvin Jack is a former Trinidad and Tobago international football team goalkeeper and was first choice at the 2006 Germany World Cup although injury restricted him to one outing against Paraguay. Jack is an ex-San Juan Jabloteh captain and played professionally in the UK with Dundee (Scotland) and Gillingham (England).
  • Kendall Tull

    Kendall Tull

    Kendall Tull is a Certified Management Accountant with the Ontario arm of the Society of Management Accountants and has an Honours degree from UWI in Industrial Management. He has over 20 years of experience in both the private and public sectors in a variety of industries at both CFO and CEO level. He is a former Trinidad and Tobago Hockey Board (TTHB) official and captain of the Queen's Park CC and Notre Dame field hockey club.
  • Keston K Perry

    Keston K Perry

    Keston is a PhD candidate in Development Studies at the University of London's School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS). He has 10 years' combined experience in the private, government and non-governmental sectors and international organisations.
  • Kevin Cassie

    Kevin Cassie is a student of journalism of COSTAATT and an avid reader of anything from best-selling novels to funny prints on t-shirts. He promised to make his wife rich through his writing and feels guilty sometimes for allowing her to believe it could happen.
  • Kevin Harrison

    Kevin Harrison is an England-born marketing official who is employed as the Operations Director at Central FC. He was the North East Stars' Marketing Manager for the 2011/12 season while he previously worked as a field agent for the English Professional Footballers Association.
  • Kimbly Pierre-Samai

    Kimbly Pierre-Samai

    Kimbly Pierre-Samai is a Wired868 intern and is employed in the Communications field at a financial institution. Pierre-Samai holds an Associate Degree with honours in Journalism and Public Relations and is a Certified Event Planner. She is currently pursuing her BA in Mass Communications at COSTAATT.
  • Kirk A Inniss

    Kirk A Inniss

    Kirk .A. Inniss is a Trinidad-born, New York-based author of The Black Butterflies and Lessons for My Children. Sometimes he works with the Writers and Poets Union, to write for his supper. He absolutely refuses to sing though.
  • Kirwin Weston

    Kirwin Weston

    Kirwin Jules Weston is a sport enthusiast, and a Physical Education student at UTT. Weston attributes his love for sport to his father who exposed him to a variety of sports from a tender age. His favourite saying is: “Success breeds success.”
  • Kito Johnson

    Kito Johnson

    Kito Johnson is a Trinbagonian freelance journalist based in the United Kingdom. He specialises in Caribbean and Latin American affairs, and has written extensively for the Trinidad & Tobago Guardian, along with Caribbean Beat Magazine, and UK based publications such as The Voice Newspapers, BBC Caribbean, and the New Black Magazine.
  • Laurel Hunt

    Laurel Hunt

    Laurel Hunt is a past pupil of Providence Girls Catholic School pursuing an Associate Degree in Journalism and Public Reations at COSTAATT. She also hopes to begin her Masters Degree in Business later this year. Hunt is currently a Business Analyst at a State Company and an intern at Wired868.
  • Leif Mathura

    Leif Mathura

    Leif Mathura is a Wired868 intern who is pursuing his BA in Mass Communication at COSTAATT. Mathura is employed in the Communication Unit at the Ministry of Public Utilities and holds an associate degree in PR and Journalism.
  • Lester Henry

    Lester Henry

    Lester Henry is a Government Senator and Senior Lecturer in Economics at UWI St Augustine. He is an ardent follower of the West Indies cricket and “Soca Warriors” football teams.
  • Letters to the Editor

    Letters to the Editor

    Want to share your thoughts with Wired868? Email us at editor@wired868.com. Please keep your blog between 300 to 800 words and be sure to read it over first for typos and punctuation.
  • Lincoln Myers

    Lincoln Myers

    Lincoln Myers is chairman of civic group, One Accord. He is an ex-government minister and senator and holds a Master's Degree in Economic Development and Latin American and Caribbean History.
  • Lisa Hernandez

    Lisa Hernandez

    Lisa Hernandez works with a local diplomatic mission and has been involved in field hockey for over 30 years.  She is a former national player and international hockey umpire who is devoted to contribute to sport in whatever capacity.
  • Lisa-Marie Brown

    Lisa-Marie Brown

    Lisa-Marie Brown is an author of a few published poems and short stories who has a passion for writing. Brown is presently pursuing her degree in Mass Communication at COSTAATT, and is a Wired868 intern.
  • Mark Lyndersay

    Mark Lyndersay

    Mark Lyndersay has been a professional photographer and journalist working in Trinidad and Tobago over the last thirty-five years. His column on personal technology, BitDepth, is the longest running continuous reporting on tech in Trinidad and Tobago.
  • Martin Daly

    Martin Daly

    Martin G Daly SC is a prominent attorney-at-law. He is a former Independent Senator and past president of the Law Association of Trinidad and Tobago. He is chairman of the Pat Bishop Foundation and a steelpan music enthusiast.
  • MATT Executive

    The Media Association of Trinidad and Tobago is the authorised representative body for local journalists in all formats.
  • Maylee Attin-Johnson

    Maylee Attin-Johnson

    Maylee Attin-Johnson is the Trinidad and Tobago Women's Senior National Team captain and has represented her country at senior international level since the age of 15. She has a bachelor's degree in Sports Management from the Kennesaw State University in Georgia, USA.
  • Mel Brennan

    Mel Brennan

    Mel is the District Executive Center Director for Baltimore City with the Y of Central Maryland and a former CONCACAF Head of Special Projects. He is the author of Sport, Revolution and the Beijing Olympics and The Apprentice: Three Years of Tragicomic Times Among The Men Running and Ruining Football will be out in late 2012. He lives with his wife and three kids in Maryland.
  • Melissa Lezama

    Melissa Lezama

    Melissa Lezama is a full-time student currently doing her AAS in Journalism/Public Relations at COSTAATT and a Wired868 intern. Lezama is a very devoted sister and daughter, and an avid reader.
  • Michelle Forde

    Michelle Forde

    Michelle Forde is a Wired868 intern, who is currently pursuing her BA in Mass Communications at COSTAATT. She also holds an Associates Degree in Marketing (COSTAATT), a Diploma in Public Relations ROYTEC), and an Associates Degree in Public Relations and Journalism (COSTAATT). Forde is married with three beautiful girls, and hopes to one day pursue her dream of being in the field of International Relations.
  • Mistah Shak

    Mistah Shak

    Mistah Shak is a Trinbagonian singer/songwriter/musician/performer from the modest but culturally vibrant southern town of Siparia. He considers himself to be an intelligent lyricist, thought provoking songwriter, competent musician and an unwavering and purposeful musical soldier.
  • Mr. Live Wire

    Mr. Live Wire

    Mr. Live Wire is an avid news reader who translates media reports for persons who can handle the truth. And satire. Unlike Jack Nicholson, he rarely yells.
  • Nadira Mathura

    Nadira Mathura

    Nadira Nicole Mathura is a COSTAATT student pursuing her B.A in Mass Communication, and currently an intern at Wired868. Mathura is the head student ambassador for COSTAATT’s City Campus, and she will like to have her own talk show focusing on helping people.
  • Narada Wilson

    Narada Wilson

    Narada Wilson is a sport executive at The Brazil Link (TBL) and is an agent for several football players including Trinidad and Tobago women's star, Ahkeela Mollon.
  • Nicholas Brathwaite

    Nicholas Brathwaite is a journalism student at COSTAATT and a big sports fan. He says he's quite sure he got his passion for sport from his family but he’s not 100% certain that the discipline, determination and capacity for hardwuk that feed it all come from the same source.
  • Nicole Philip Greene

    Nicole Philip Greene

    Nicole is an IT Strategic Consultant and a mother of three. Or that should be the other way around. Follow her blog as she trys to master this "parenting thing" at http://whendidibecomemymom.com/
  • Nigel Grosvenor

    Nigel Grosvenor is the head coach of St Anthony's College and a former Trinidad and Tobago national under-17 head coach.
  • None Of The Above

    None Of The Above

    None Of The Above cares deeply about politics or is not bothered at all. None Of The Above wants to make a significant contribution to this country but prefers to do so anonymously. None Of The Above could be you. If it is, please write to editor@wired868.com and have your say. Please keep contributions below 600 words.
  • Ornella Brathwaite

    Ornella Brathwaite

    Ornella Brathwaite is a final year student at COSTAATT pursuing a Bachelor’s degree in Mass Communications and presently a Wired868 intern. Her dream is to become an entrepreneur in the near future. Ornella strongly believes in humility and giving to the less fortunate; “One should never look down on anyone, unless he/she is attempting to help that individual up.” Ornella enjoys meeting new people, exploring different countries and spending time with my family, especially her nephews.
  • Otancia Noel

    Otancia Noel

    Otancia Noel has a Literatures in English bachelor's degree at COSTAATT and is finishing a Masters in Fine Arts, Creative writing and Prose Fiction at UWI. She grew up on the Jamaat-al-Muslimeen compound in Mucurapo.
  • Pashan Patrick

    Pashan Patrick

    Pashan Patrick is currently a student at COSTAATT pursuing a BA in Mass Communications and a Wired868 intern. She is dedicated and driven with a passion for Event Planning and Journalism. Patrick aspires to be a leading sport journalist in the future. Although she plays rugby and is a member of Royalians Rugby Football Club, Patrick enjoys watching basketball, football and cricket.
  • Peter O'Connor

    Peter O'Connor

    Peter O’Connor served as TTFA president between 1985 and 1990 when he stepped down. He rejoined the TTFF in 2003 as “Marketing Manager/General Co-ordinator” and remained on board until after T&T’s qualification for Germany 2006.
  • Phillip Alexander

    Phillip Alexander is a blogger as well as a social and political activist.
  • Raffique Shah

    Raffique Shah

    Raffique Shah is a columnist for over three decades, founder of the T&T International Marathon, co-founder of the ULF with Basdeo Panday and George Weekes, a former sugar cane farmers union leader and an ex-Siparia MP. He trained at the UK’s Royal Military Academy Sandhurst and was arrested, court-martialled, sentenced and eventually freed on appeal after leading 300 troops in a mutiny at Teteron Barracks during the Black Power revolution of 1970.
  • Raheema Sayyid-Andrews

    Raheema Sayyid-Andrews

    Raheema Sayyid-Andrews is currently pursuing a Bachelor's degree in Journalism/Mass Communication at COSTAATT. A wife, a mother and a lover of the English language with over 20 years experience of reading novels, she has a limitless supply of stories to share, her way of demonstrating the sheer power of the written word.
  • Raymond Tim Kee

    Raymond Tim Kee

    Raymond Tim Kee was elected unopposed as the Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation (TTFF) president on 11 November 2012. Tim Kee previously served as a TTFF vice-president from the mid-1990s to 2010. He is also the Port of Spain Mayor, a Guardian Life Insurance executive and runs his own insurance firm, R.A. Tim Kee Investments Limited.
  • Richard Braithwaite

    Richard Braithwaite

    Richard Braithwaite is a leading consultant in Strategic Communication and a former FIFA Technical Development Committee member. He received a Prime Ministerial award in 1998 for his contribution to sport while he wrote two chapters in the recently published book “From Oil to Gas and Beyond”.
  • Rishi Maharaj

    Rishi Maharaj

    Rishi Maharaj is the CEO of Disclosure Today. He holds a BSc. and MSc. in Government from UWI and has over 10 years work experience in Trinidad and Tobago's public sector. He is also a certified member of the Canadian Institute of Access and Privacy Professionals.
  • Roger Bonair-Agard

    Roger Bonair-Agard

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  1. How can I become a contributor?

  2. Date: March 14, 2017
    Crime Plan: Trinidad and Tobago
    Crime is a symptom of major planks in the structure of society gone wrong.
    Who, What, When, Where, Why and How?
    Who are the people responsible for committing crime? Whose interest is being served?
    What kind of crime is most prevalent? What is the method of choice?
    What are the time lines? Is the force strength optimized to prevent and is trained to disrupt this particular type of criminal?
    When are most murders committed? Is there a causation pattern where targeted intervention can take place?
    Why is criminal activity geared towards particular communities, individuals and groups (gangs)
    How has criminal activity been analyzed and categorized?
    What needs are being served by criminals (drugs, poverty, permanent

    Premise:
    There are a high number of individuals involved in the commission of crime in Trinidad and Tobago! What are the facts?
    There is long held and reinforced stigmatism by street address. Redlining from birth.
    Criminal activity is pervasive and applies to multiple sectors. Have crime leaders been identified?
    Crime prevention initiatives:
    What does it cost the society? Is the goal disruption or destruction of the criminal apparatus? What are the alternatives to these specific criminal activities? Are these criminal redeemable or are they condemned to permanent incarceration.
    Can those costs be turned into investments?
    • The majority of criminal activity is rooted in the absence of hope and the availability of high resources to be diverted to crime.
    Who are the benefactors of this activity?
    • Who are the crime brokers and what is the structure, design, methods and execution?
    • How much of these activities are sanctioned by the activities of the government or lack of enforcement by the government?
    • Is criminal activity part of gross national product? In other words is it so endemic that it is relied upon as part of the economic fabric of the country.
    Is law enforcement services really the last group to find out about new crime waves and is action or inaction based on crime statistics after the fact?
    • The numbers of gunshot casualties and victims in T&T havs been at record levels for each succeeding year for several years if the rate of increase is based on five years averages.
    • Vulnerability and large supply of victims: The haves versus the never will have.
    • Purposeful blindness of law enforcement: No alternatives offered other than imprisonment and meaningless government sponsored employment
    High dependency on government sector:
    • No escalator in place for persons with high aptitude
    • The violent crime level has chased out of the communities people of a certain income level, leading the absence of economic escalators.
    • Whatever trappings of success from hard work becomes the inventory for theft and/or harassment
    • The most vulnerable are treated as cannon fodder. Women are not protected and rape, murder and kidnapping are the normal lead of the evening news.
    Society based on nepotism:
    • In a society based on nepotism and privilege, how does a young person fight back and what are the options for success. How can that young person learn about available opportunities in legitimate spaces in the economy?
    o The government, which includes ministers, should be required to have monthly meetings within the community that deliver real transparency and provide the registration materials for the most vulnerable in crime infested areas to apply.
    o Is opportunity and exploitation morphed into the same thing? How do you get young adults to trust it?

    Recommendation:
    • Rebuild belief in the normalcy of community or put them in places where they never existed.
    o The emphasis on sport and recreation are good but not true options to economic success.
    • Have every person who attains the age of eighteen or has completed high school to enlist in one of the protective or health services.
    o Make this national service mandatory.
    o Rebuild national trust through service.
    o Provide a stipend similar to what it would cost to maintain a prisoner in one of the institutions of incarceration.
    • Reduce the no-work/make-work agencies and convert to training programs (Jude, CEPEP, Etc.)
    o Conversion and training program to the private sector jobs.
    How could you not know where the guns are coming from and where they are going?
    • If that question cannot be answered satisfactorily, then the law enforcement leaders ought to be replaced or the government will be at the next election.
    • Since Trinidad and Tobago are islands and most gun traders don’t live in water, are there really alternative hiding places.
    • Why is there not dedicated and trained law enforcement teams prepared for the influx of guns?
    o Are the people to remain in fear of this menace forever or is this a tactic of subjugation?
    o The national government seems to be silent on laying down the law on guns and their brokers. This does not seem like an enterprise that is being conducted on a piece-meal basis.
    o Why don’t our Prime Minister and attorney general dispense with the formalities and charge Venezuela and other governments for transporting illegal guns over their borders into Trinidad. Make it a condition for trade.
    o Gun trader should be given life sentences without exception
    o Raise this issue at the U.N. as a condition for any votes that support the U.S. and all countries in South and Central America. Let CARICOM vote as a block on this issue.
    And what about the people’s money?
    • Move retirement plan dollars into national stock/mutual fund programs
    o Implement FATCA and AML programs immediately. The game in which the opposition is engaged is fundamentally dangerous and if there are seizure laws already on the books, the businesses of their friends, families and others that are flaunting the law should be sanctioned. No government purchase ought to be transacted with these companies, starting with immediate effect.
     All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others. Essentially, this is Kamla’s position.
    o Forensic Auditing should be a requirement for accounting and economic grads at all universities and institutions of higher learning. Teams of auditors must now be part of the taxing infrastructure until FATCA laws are passed. It would probably take four classes to specialize in forensics.
    http://www.forensisgroup.com/expert-witness/auditing/?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Business&utm_term=forensic%20auditing&utm_content=Auditing

    • Encourage regular middle income residents of Trinidad and Tobago to invest in the corporations that are domiciled in the country, especially banking institutions.
    o Revitalize the Caribbean investment marketplace in downtown Port-of-Spain (Manning initiative). Eliminate the real estate vacancies.
    o Government built real estate must now provide a stated return-on-investment and not be left to corrupting influences. Full transparency is required here. This is true for all government owned assets. If they do not provide a five-year average return, then they must be sold and become part of the tax structure.
     For government agencies that are thirty years of more, conversion to privately run companies should be part of the budget reduction plan. These companies must be 60% owned by citizens of T&T and no person or company should own more than 20% of any national asset.
    Lack of follow through:
    Can we state once and for all what the economic challenges are?
    • Chronic lack of diversification
    • After the energy sector, what are the top ten industries and what percentage of production is exportable?
    • Is brain power a financial resource?
    • Given the doors to the U.S. and Europe are being closed, what skill sets will open them and do we have the infrastructure in place so that brain power is a marketable commodity. Let the businesses come to us. How to commoditize online and administrative resources.
    • How can we make our markets, services and products retentive to our population? (If 20% of Mexican migrant workers are blocked from working in the gardens of the U.S., possible 50% of the population will starve)
    Woeful tax collection effort and strategy
    o No real development of a taxable market place
    o Prioritize net favorable foreign exchange as a national objective.
    No targeted efforts to reduce employable capacity.
    There are a number of people who have given up looking for jobs or are displaced in the current economy. If these unemployment figures are true then the 64% labor participation rate is suspect.
    Where are they and what industries can be altered to accommodate them?
    Unemployment Rate in Trinidad and Tobago averaged 10.67 percent from 1991 until 2015, reaching an all-time high of 21.10 percent in the first quarter of 1993 and a record low of 3.10 percent in the first quarter of 2014.

    No coordination between private sector and government sector to lower unemployment that is region specific (nepotism the controlling factor).
    The ratio of government employees is far too high. The 64% labor participation rate is deceptive. The male to female disparities are stark, according to a study published in 2011 using 2009 data. (Karen Roopnaring and Dindial Ramrattan)
    http://www.central-bank.org.tt/sites/default/files/Female%20Labour%20Force%20Participation%20-%20The%20Case%20of%20Trinidad%20and%20Tobago%20-%20K.%20Roopnarine%20and%20D.%20Ramrattan.pdf
    Major resources (employment in energy sector controlled by unions)
    o Unions do not promote ownership in the resources that pay for their livelihood and therefore, cannot benefit from the profitability inherent in fruits of their labor.
    o Concentration of labor creates the possibility for corruption.
    The religious sectors are not being progressive
    o Priest, pundits and imams are not change makers;
    o They are similar to the government usually a day and a dollar short.
    o Suffer in silence and make better choices while your throat is being cut.

    Alternatives to growing illicit drugs:
    Agroponics/Aquaponics
    https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=agroponics&qpvt=agroponics&qpvt=agroponics&qpvt=agroponics&FORM=IGRE
    http://www.agroponic.com/
    Micro gardens: Get the Universities involved!
    o For university agriculture students, participation is mandatory.
    o For food consuming industries, purchasing is strongly encouraged
    o For existing agri-businesses, partnerships as a condition tax discounting
    o Community centered organic gardens, growing vegetables and spices for domestic consumption and/or export. It would entail the distribution of 1,000 wooden boxes to each distressed community to grow specific and scientifically validated products.
    o Instructions to be given for soil testing, water requirements, harvesting and making market.
    o Saleable food and fresh herbs will takes weeks and not years to produce. Restaurant owners can commission the products needed and food will have a ready market already established.
    Will one thousand ten foot by four feet boxes growing food on Laventille hill make a difference in the crime rate?

    Alternatives to manufacturing illicit drugs:
    Will two hundred young smart individuals working in a new pharmaceutical industry make a difference in Success Village or Chaguanas?
    • This is a challenge for the ministers and the government of Trinidad and Tobago. If we break it down by number, can we then make it happen with headcount and accountability?
    • A specific challenge for the education system of Trinidad and Tobago (instead of waiting for arbitrary circumstances to evolve, proactive targeting of industry for crime specific regions by providing opportunities as alternatives. How do you eliminate the marginalization of individuals from certain street addresses? You can start by building the new economic frontier at those addresses.
    Pharmaceutical production.
    o With the very high education level and the high unemployment among young adults, Trinidad and Tobago is the perfect region to start a pharmaceutical production industry.
    o Involvement by the local university system with the appropriate international standards can very easily become instrumental in setting up these relatively small companies right in the middle of the “at risk” neighborhoods.
    o It is the lesson of the national lottery, whatever the criminal enterprise, build and alternative industry in order to take away its power. The only caveat is to make the new enterprise substantially better than the criminal one.
    Next Generation:
    Civic duty and the benefits to society are currently frowned upon. (see recommendation)
    • Lessons about preparing the population for civic duty is not being learned and this potential game changer is not being emulated.
    • There is no money in it

  3. Date: February 21, 2017
    Crime Plan: Trinidad and Tobago
    Crime is a symptom of major planks in the structure of society gone wrong.
    Who, What, When, Where, Why and How?
    Who are the people responsible for committing crime? Whose interest is being served?
    What kind of crime is most prevalent? What is the method of choice?
    What are the time lines? Is the force strength optimized to prevent and is trained to disrupt this particular type of criminal?
    When are most murders committed? Is there a causation pattern where targeted intervention can take place?
    Why is criminal activity geared towards particular communities, individuals and groups (gangs)
    How has criminal activity been analyzed and categorized?
    What needs are being served by criminals (drugs, poverty, permanent

    Premise:
    There are a high number of individuals involved in the commission of crime in Trinidad and Tobago! What are the facts?
    There is long held and reinforced stigmatism by street address. Redlining from birth.
    Criminal activity is pervasive and applies to multiple sectors. Have crime leaders been identified?
    Crime prevention initiatives:
    What does it cost the society? Is the goal disruption or destruction of the criminal apparatus? What are the alternatives to these specific criminal activities? Are these criminal redeemable or are they condemned to permanent incarceration.
    Can those costs be turned into investments?
    • The majority of criminal activity is rooted in the absence of hope and the availability of high resources to be diverted to crime.
    Who are the benefactors of this activity?
    • Who are the crime brokers and what is the structure, design, methods and execution?
    • How much of these activities are sanctioned by the activities of the government or lack of enforcement by the government?
    • Is criminal activity part of gross national product? In other words is it so endemic that it is relied upon as part of the economic fabric of the country.
    Is law enforcement services really the last group to find out about new crime waves and is action or inaction based on crime statistics after the fact?
    • The numbers of gunshot casualties and victims in T&T havs been at record levels for each succeeding year for several years if the rate of increase is based on five years averages.
    • Vulnerability and large supply of victims: The haves versus the never will have.
    • Purposeful blindness of law enforcement: No alternatives offered other than imprisonment and meaningless government sponsored employment
    High dependency on government sector:
    • No escalator in place for persons with high aptitude
    • The violent crime level has chased out of the communities people of a certain income level, leading the absence of economic escalators.
    • Whatever trappings of success from hard work becomes the inventory for theft and/or harassment
    • The most vulnerable are treated as cannon fodder. Women are not protected and rape, murder and kidnapping are the normal lead of the evening news.
    Society based on nepotism:
    • In a society based on nepotism and privilege, how does a young person fight back and what are the options for success. How can that young person learn about available opportunities in legitimate spaces in the economy?
    o The government, which includes ministers, should be required to have monthly meetings within the community that deliver real transparency and provide the registration materials for the most vulnerable in crime infested areas to apply.
    o Is opportunity and exploitation morphed into the same thing? How do you get young adults to trust it?

    Recommendation:
    • Rebuild belief in the normalcy of community or put them in places where they never existed.
    o The emphasis on sport and recreation are good but not true options to economic success.
    • Have every person who attains the age of eighteen or has completed high school to enlist in one of the protective or health services.
    o Make this national service mandatory.
    o Rebuild national trust through service.
    o Provide a stipend similar to what it would cost to maintain a prisoner in one of the institutions of incarceration.
    • Reduce the no-work/make-work agencies and convert to training programs (Jude, CEPEP, Etc.)
    o Conversion and training program to the private sector jobs.
    How could you not know where the guns are coming from and where they are going?
    • If that question cannot be answered satisfactorily, then the law enforcement leaders ought to be replaced or the government will be at the next election.
    • Since Trinidad and Tobago are islands and most gun traders don’t live in water, are there really alternative hiding places.
    • Why is there not dedicated and trained law enforcement teams prepared for the influx of guns?
    o Are the people to remain in fear of this menace forever or is this a tactic of subjugation?
    o The national government seems to be silent on laying down the law on guns and their brokers. This does not seem like an enterprise that is being conducted on a piece-meal basis.
    o Why don’t our Prime Minister and attorney general dispense with the formalities and charge Venezuela and other governments for transporting illegal guns over their borders into Trinidad. Make it a condition for trade.
    o Gun trader should be given life sentences without exception
    o Raise this issue at the U.N. as a condition for any votes that support the U.S. and all countries in South and Central America. Let CARICOM vote as a block on this issue.
    And what about the people’s money?
    • Move retirement plan dollars into national stock/mutual fund programs
    o Implement FATCA and AML programs immediately. The game in which the opposition is engaged is fundamentally dangerous and if there are seizure laws already on the books, the businesses of their friends, families and others that are flaunting the law should be sanctioned. No government purchase ought to be transacted with these companies, starting with immediate effect.
     All animals are equal but some animals are more equal than others. Essentially, this is Kamla’s position.
    o Forensic Auditing should be a requirement for accounting and economic grads at all universities and institutions of higher learning. Teams of auditors must now be part of the taxing infrastructure until FATCA laws are passed. It would probably take four classes to specialize in forensics.
    http://www.forensisgroup.com/expert-witness/auditing/?utm_source=bing&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=Business&utm_term=forensic%20auditing&utm_content=Auditing

    • Encourage regular middle income residents of Trinidad and Tobago to invest in the corporations that are domiciled in the country, especially banking institutions.
    o Revitalize the Caribbean investment marketplace in downtown Port-of-Spain (Manning initiative). Eliminate the real estate vacancies.
    o Government built real estate must now provide a stated return-on-investment and not be left to corrupting influences. Full transparency is required here. This is true for all government owned assets. If they do not provide a five-year average return, then they must be sold and become part of the tax structure.
     For government agencies that are thirty years of more, conversion to privately run companies should be part of the budget reduction plan. These companies must be 60% owned by citizens of T&T and no person or company should own more than 20% of any national asset.
    Lack of follow through:
    Can we state once and for all what the economic challenges are?
    • Chronic lack of diversification
    • After the energy sector, what are the top ten industries and what percentage of production is exportable?
    • Is brain power a financial resource?
    • Given the doors to the U.S. and Europe are being closed, what skill sets will open them and do we have the infrastructure in place so that brain power is a marketable commodity. Let the businesses come to us. How to commoditize online and administrative resources.
    • How can we make our markets, services and products retentive to our population? (If 20% of Mexican migrant workers are blocked from working in the gardens of the U.S., possible 50% of the population will starve)
    Woeful tax collection effort and strategy
    o No real development of a taxable market place
    o Prioritize net favorable foreign exchange as a national objective.
    No targeted efforts to reduce employable capacity.
    There are a number of people who have given up looking for jobs or are displaced in the current economy. If these unemployment figures are true then the 64% labor participation rate is suspect.
    Where are they and what industries can be altered to accommodate them?
    Unemployment Rate in Trinidad and Tobago averaged 10.67 percent from 1991 until 2015, reaching an all-time high of 21.10 percent in the first quarter of 1993 and a record low of 3.10 percent in the first quarter of 2014.

    No coordination between private sector and government sector to lower unemployment that is region specific (nepotism the controlling factor).
    The ratio of government employees is far too high. The 64% labor participation rate is deceptive. The male to female disparities are stark, according to a study published in 2011 using 2009 data. (Karen Roopnaring and Dindial Ramrattan)
    http://www.central-bank.org.tt/sites/default/files/Female%20Labour%20Force%20Participation%20-%20The%20Case%20of%20Trinidad%20and%20Tobago%20-%20K.%20Roopnarine%20and%20D.%20Ramrattan.pdf
    Major resources (employment in energy sector controlled by unions)
    o Unions do not promote ownership in the resources that pay for their livelihood and therefore, cannot benefit from the profitability inherent in fruits of their labor.
    o Concentration of labor creates the possibility for corruption.
    The religious sectors are not being progressive
    o Priest, pundits and imams are not change makers;
    o They are similar to the government usually a day and a dollar short.
    o Suffer in silence and make better choices while your throat is being cut.

    Alternatives to growing illicit drugs:
    Agroponics/Aquaponics
    https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=agroponics&qpvt=agroponics&qpvt=agroponics&qpvt=agroponics&FORM=IGRE
    http://www.agroponic.com/
    Micro gardens: Get the Universities involved!
    o For university agriculture students, participation is mandatory.
    o For food consuming industries, purchasing is strongly encouraged
    o For existing agri-businesses, partnerships as a condition tax discounting
    o Community centered organic gardens, growing vegetables and spices for domestic consumption and/or export. It would entail the distribution of 1,000 wooden boxes to each distressed community to grow specific and scientifically validated products.
    o Instructions to be given for soil testing, water requirements, harvesting and making market.
    o Saleable food and fresh herbs will takes weeks and not years to produce. Restaurant owners can commission the products needed and food will have a ready market already established.
    Will one thousand ten foot by four feet boxes growing food on Laventille hill make a difference in the crime rate?

    Alternatives to manufacturing illicit drugs:
    Will two hundred young smart individuals working in a new pharmaceutical industry make a difference in Success Village or Chaguanas?
    • This is a challenge for the ministers and the government of Trinidad and Tobago. If we break it down by number, can we then make it happen with headcount and accountability?
    • A specific challenge for the education system of Trinidad and Tobago (instead of waiting for arbitrary circumstances to evolve, proactive targeting of industry for crime specific regions by providing opportunities as alternatives. How do you eliminate the marginalization of individuals from certain street addresses? You can start by building the new economic frontier at those addresses.
    Pharmaceutical production.
    o With the very high education level and the high unemployment among young adults, Trinidad and Tobago is the perfect region to start a pharmaceutical production industry.
    o Involvement by the local university system with the appropriate international standards can very easily become instrumental in setting up these relatively small companies right in the middle of the “at risk” neighborhoods.
    o It is the lesson of the national lottery, whatever the criminal enterprise, build and alternative industry in order to take away its power. The only caveat is to make the new enterprise substantially better than the criminal one.
    Next Generation:
    Civic duty and the benefits to society are currently frowned upon. (see recommendation)
    • Lessons about preparing the population for civic duty is not being learned and this potential game changer is not being emulated.
    • There is no money in it