Home / Volley / Global Football / Russia 2018, Kenwyne, the media, DJW… Wired868 reviews Lawrence’s unveiling

Russia 2018, Kenwyne, the media, DJW… Wired868 reviews Lawrence’s unveiling

“His head took us to the World Cup in 2006,” said Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president David John-Williams, “now he is charged with using that same head in a different way to take us to Russia 2018.”

So began the era of new Trinidad and Tobago National Senior Team head coach Dennis Lawrence at a press conference yesterday morning at the TTFA’s headquarters in the Hasely Crawford Stadium, Port of Spain.

Photo: Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president David John-Williams (right) makes a ceremonial gesture to his new Men's National Senior Team head coach Dennis Lawrence at the TTFA headquarters on 30 January 2017. (Copyright Allan V Crane/TTFA)
Photo: Trinidad and Tobago Football Association (TTFA) president David John-Williams (right) makes a ceremonial gesture to his new Men’s National Senior Team head coach Dennis Lawrence at the TTFA headquarters on 30 January 2017.
(Copyright Allan V Crane/TTFA)

“I have known Dennis for quite a while, we have had a very close relationship,” said John-Williams. “Let me put it on the table one time, he once played for W Connection…”

Lawrence, whose headed goal against Bahrain clinched Trinidad and Tobago’s place at the Germany 2006 World Cup, never actually represented W Connection in a competitive match and only wore their colours at an invitational tournament in 2000.

But the wisecrack from the TTFA president—whose role as Connection co-founder and owner has been a source of concern for football stakeholders—was delivered with flawless precision and set the tone for a cosy affair.

Unlike Tom Saintfiet’s maiden press conference last month, there was no exaggerated bluster from the football president or unnecessary preening by the new coach.

“I am absolutely honoured and delighted,” said Lawrence, “to be chosen by the Trinidad and Tobago Football Federation…”

John-Williams interjected with a chuckle: “Association… Federation is a bad word.”

Photo: TTFA president David John-Williams (centre), media officer Shaun Fuentes (left) and new Soca Warriors coach Dennis Lawrence at the TTFA headquarters on 30 January 2017. (Copyright Allan V Crane/TTFA)
Photo: TTFA president David John-Williams (centre), media officer Shaun Fuentes (left) and new Soca Warriors coach Dennis Lawrence at the TTFA headquarters on 30 January 2017.
(Copyright Allan V Crane/TTFA)

Lawrence was not the TTFA president’s first choice, of course. Or the technical committee’s for that matter. That was W Connection head coach Stuart Charles-Fevrier.

And, notably, half of the TTFA technical committee—chairman Dexter Skeene, vice-chairman Alvin Henderson and ordinary member Errol Lovell—resigned almost immediately after the board of directors overturned their recommendation to appoint Lawrence, who the advisory body had also ranked below former Central FC and San Juan Jabloteh coach Terry Fenwick.

All the same, Lawrence can surely count on the goodwill earned by his decade long career as an international footballer. At six foot seven, he looked like a giraffe in a football boots at first glance. But he had decent feet, a good football brain and was as brave and dedicated as they came.

After the instability of Saintfiet’s brief yet tumultuous reign, the Soca Warriors would probably be comforted by his warm tones in the dressing room and the initial response from the players was encouraging.

More than anything, though, Lawrence has always been a guy who embraces the status quo—he was among the first players to withdraw from action against the TTFA over the 2006 World Cup bonus offer—and, noticeably, he appeared to be singing from the same hymn sheet as his football president.

Photo: Trinidad and Tobago supporters pose for a photograph during a break in Russia 2018 World Cup qualifying action against Costa Rica at the Hasely Crawford Stadium on 11 November 2016. (Courtesy Sean Morrison/Wired868)
Photo: Trinidad and Tobago supporters pose for a photograph during a break in Russia 2018 World Cup qualifying action against Costa Rica at the Hasely Crawford Stadium on 11 November 2016.
(Courtesy Sean Morrison/Wired868)

Twice, John-Williams was moved to thump the table in support of his coach’s oratory. And neither occasion was in any way related to the promise of getting to the Russia 2018 World Cup or winning matches.

John-Williams’ first display of support came when Lawrence suggested that his international players should not be motivated by money.

“To play for Trinidad and Tobago is a privilege and a honour,” said Lawrence. “[…] The first time I ever got a penny to play football was when I signed for Wrexham. All throughout my career, I played football for the love of the game. And I think the players need to understand that football is a passion.

“Trinidad and Tobago is our country. We are here to represent Trinidad and Tobago… There are going to be a group of 25, 30 players who will have an opportunity to represent this beautiful nation, so they need to embrace that.”

Lawrence was, arguably, being economical with the truth of his professional career though. He was not a paid footballer in Trinidad and Tobago. But then it was football that got him into Defence Force, which has always been one of the most stable jobs possible for a local player.

Photo: Stern John (second from right) celebrates with goal scorer Dennis Lawrence (centre), Kenwyne Jones (far right), Aurtis Whitley (second from left) and Cyd Gray after going ahead against Bahrain in a famous 2006 World Cup playoff contest on 16 November 2005. (Copyright AFP 2014)
Photo: Stern John (second from right) celebrates with goal scorer Dennis Lawrence (centre), Kenwyne Jones (far right), Aurtis Whitley (second from left) and Cyd Gray after going ahead against Bahrain in a famous 2006 World Cup playoff contest on 16 November 2005.
(Copyright AFP 2014)

Ironically, John-Williams later admitted that his football body still has not paid the 22 players who represented Trinidad and Tobago over the Christmas holidays in Nicaragua and then in the Gold Cup play offs earlier this month.

Typically, the debt was met with a breezy response from the football president who did not even offer a deadline for when the Soca Warriors would be paid.

“The players have not been paid as yet,” said John-Williams, “but they will be paid in the coming weeks.”

Lawrence also cheered up his football president when he refused to reveal the length of his contract.

“The length of my contract is the length of my citizenship. I am here and I am committed to Trinidad and Tobago, if it takes the rest of my life…”

Lawrence gave away little else when pressed further.

“I think the length of the contract is not important to me. What is important to me is trying to prepare the team for the next game, which is against Panama. The length of the contract is irrelevant and I think it is something that is personal between myself and the Federation.”

Photo: Trinidad and Tobago head coach Dennis Lawrence talks to the media at the TTFA headquarters on 30 January 2017. (Copyright Allan V Crane/TTFA)
Photo: Trinidad and Tobago head coach Dennis Lawrence talks to the media at the TTFA headquarters on 30 January 2017.
(Copyright Allan V Crane/TTFA)

The first part was surely untrue. Lawrence, according to his agent Mike Berry, initially refused to take the job until he had the desired job security. Now that he is happy, though, it is nobody else’s business.

“I am here to work with the media,” said Lawrence, “and I will like to let the media know that I will not conduct my business through the media.”

Lawrence allowed John-Williams to make the biggest announcement of the press conference, which was the signing of his assistant coach, Sol Campbell, a former England and Arsenal legend.

“Through the hard work of the president,” said Lawrence, “I think it is only fair that he makes the announcement…”

Campbell subsequently told CNC3 that he would arrive in Trinidad to start work on 10 March, which is likely to be weeks after Lawrence’s first training session with the local-based squad.

While, the new Warriors coach deferred to his president on his assistant coach, he made it clear that the future of former national captain and his World Cup 2006 teammate Kenwyne Jones would be his call.

Photo: Trinidad and Tobago captain Kenwyne Jones celebrates his goal against Mexico in the 2015 CONCACAF Gold Cup. (Courtesy CONCACAF)
Photo: Trinidad and Tobago captain Kenwyne Jones celebrates his goal against Mexico in the 2015 CONCACAF Gold Cup.
(Courtesy CONCACAF)

“Kenwyne is a player that I know very well. I played with Kenwyne, I spoke to Kenwyne. I have got a relationship with Kenwyne.

“Kenwyne gave yeoman service to Trinidad and Tobago football… Football players will have ups and downs in their careers. I need to support the player and encourage the player to get back to where he can be.”

John-Williams, whose own relationship with Jones is known to be strained, looked straight ahead and blinked repeatedly.

Lawrence hinted too at a better working relationship with Pro League clubs than his predecessor. Of course, Saintfiet’s problems seemed to revolve around one team, Central FC—who the Belgian compared unfavourably with Bangladesh—but it did not help his cause that they were the defending Caribbean and Pro League champions and obviously possessed some of the nation’s top players.

Lawrence was more statesmanlike.

“I have got to be respectful to the players’ football clubs,” said Lawrence. “They are all in competition at the moment. So I plan to sit down with them and find out when it will be appropriate to have the players available.”

Photo: Trinidad and Tobago National Senior Team head coach Dennis Lawrence (right) chats with National Under-20 Team coach Brian Williams on Thursday 26 January 2017. (Courtesy Sean Morrison/Wired868)
Photo: Trinidad and Tobago National Senior Team head coach Dennis Lawrence (right) chats with National Under-20 Team coach Brian Williams on Thursday 26 January 2017.
(Courtesy Sean Morrison/Wired868)

Okay, let’s get down to brass tacks… Saintfiet was told to either muster four points from two games against Panama or Mexico in March or get lost.

So what does Lawrence need to achieve?

“There is only one promise I can make. I am here as a very proud and passionate Trinidad and Tobago citizen. I am a son of the soil and I promise to give everything to make sure we prepare our best for not just today but the future.”

Can you give us a bit more detail, coach?

“First and foremost [my job] is to prepare the players, mentally, physically and tactically, for the task at hand. And the task at hand is the next game which is Panama. This is the only focus that we can have. I am here to try to unite a country and encourage the fans to support the players…”

Well, what would success be for you as national coach?

Photo: Trinidad and Tobago midfielder Khaleem Hyland (second from right) gestures to fans after Joevin Jones' second goal against Guatemala during Russia 2018 World Cup qualifying action at the Hasely Crawford Stadium in Port of Spain on Friday 2 September 2016. Both teams played to a 2-2 draw. (Courtesy Chevaughn Christopher/Wired868
Photo: Trinidad and Tobago midfielder Khaleem Hyland (second from right) gestures to fans after Joevin Jones’ second goal against Guatemala during Russia 2018 World Cup qualifying action at the Hasely Crawford Stadium in Port of Spain on Friday 2 September 2016.
Both teams played to a 2-2 draw.
(Courtesy Chevaughn Christopher/Wired868

“Success for me is longevity in terms of our development. But, as I said before, first and foremost, we have the Russia campaign in front of us and we need to make sure that the players are prepared and we are ready for this challenge and ready for these games…

“The players must demonstrate to the public that when we take to the pitch on the 24th of March; the public can see a team fighting for our country, fighting for our flag and fighting to get a victory.”

Anything more tangible than that coach? Maybe even the Caribbean Cup?

“I think the intelligent people in the room will understand that the last time we won the Caribbean Cup, I was still playing, which was 2001… It is time to put a foundation in place where we can now propel ourselves; where we can dominate the Caribbean again.

“That is where my aim is. But the prominent thing in front of us now is Russia.”

In short, there was no question that could get past his long legs. And nothing short of waterboarding seemed capable of forcing anything more than a cliched response.

Photo: Trinidad and Tobago defender Dennis Lawrence (left) tackles Sweden forward Zlatan Ibrahimovic (centre) during the 2006 World Cup at the Dortmund stadium on 10 June 2016. Looking on is Brent Sancho. (Copyright AFP 2016/Sven Nackstrand)
Photo: Trinidad and Tobago defender Dennis Lawrence (left) tackles Sweden forward Zlatan Ibrahimovic (centre) during the 2006 World Cup at the Dortmund stadium on 10 June 2016.
Looking on is Brent Sancho.
(Copyright AFP 2016/Sven Nackstrand)

Of course, Lawrence comes from an environment of 24/7 football stations and would have seen hundreds of press conference in his time. His mentor, Roberto Martinez, was savaged by the English media for being cheery to the point of naive about his Everton football club, just before he was sacked for a dismal run of matches.

It was Lawrence’s last coaching job as Martinez could only offer him the position of scout at the Belgium National Senior Team. And “Tallest” seems to be happy to err on the side of the caution, as far as the media goes.

It is a default position that would suit John-Williams and his current TTFA board down to the bone.

The resignations of Skeene, Henderson and Lovell—who slunk away with nary a word after being involved in three controversial decisions: the sacking of Stephen Hart and the appointments of Saintfiet and Lawrence—would be a prime example.

Of course, the most important aspect of Lawrence’s job from here on, ought not to be his relationship with the football president or the media but with the players.

And, despite offering little sympathy for their financial considerations, Lawrence spoke about his future players with respect and enthusiasm. He suggested that his six years at Wigan Athletic and Everton, as well as his career as an international player, prepared him for just this moment.

Photo: Former Everton FC manager Roberto Martinez (second from right) speaks to assistants Dennis Lawrence (far right) and Graeme Jones during a file photo.
Photo: Former Everton FC manager Roberto Martinez (second from right) speaks to assistants Dennis Lawrence (far right) and Graeme Jones during a file photo.

“It has been a long journey for myself with regards the preparation for this appointment—a journey that was started a long while aback… I’d like to thank Roberto Martinez and Graeme Martinez, which is the staff that invited me onboard at the Wigan Athletic coaching set up and allowed me to be part of an incredible team and to develop myself…

“I want the players to understand that it is important to enjoy this challenge because this is the challenge that will change Trinidad and Tobago football from here on in.”

When asked about his ability to instil discipline in the Warriors’ dressing room, Lawrence pointed to his four and a half year career in the Army as well as his own spotless record as an international player.

But, unlike his predecessor, he was far too professional to risk straining his relationship with the players so as to show off for the cameras.

“We need to work with the players because the players are young players,” said Lawrence. “And when you deal with human beings, there will always be errors but it is about how you deal with the errors… There will be clear guidelines about what I expect…

Photo: Trinidad and Tobago international midfielder Kevin Molino (right) trains with his teammates at the Hasely Crawford Stadium on 21 March 2015. (Courtesy Nicholas Bhajan/Wired868)
Photo: Trinidad and Tobago international midfielder Kevin Molino (right) trains with his teammates at the Hasely Crawford Stadium on 21 March 2015.
(Courtesy Nicholas Bhajan/Wired868)

“I believe in the players’ ability. I wouldn’t take this job if I didn’t have belief… At this moment in time, my belief is if we come together and all pull in one direction […] then everything is possible.

“And of course, the most important thing is we need a bit of luck and we need good guidance from the Man up above.”

By measure of his towering frame, Lawrence is probably closer to the Man up above than most.

And, with that, Trinidad and Tobago football was into the Tallest era.

About Lasana Liburd

Lasana Liburd
Lasana Liburd is the CEO and Editor at Wired868.com and a journalist with over 15 years experience at several local and international publications including Play the Game, World Soccer, UK Guardian and the Trinidad Express.

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26 comments

  1. He never even answered the questions properly eh, another rookie Coach, seems that we are going backwards instead of forward eh. Them really good yes. hahahaha

  2. Oh gosh just try first nah win some games and then we can’t even make Caribbean cup farless world cup

  3. Kelvin ,it’s a banana republic culture of rich administrators and poor athletes

  4. Tallest”on shit awot? I read this article and I’m more upset than excited from what I read. This man worked under Beenhakker, and if I recall correctly Beenhakker instilled a sense of pride , self worth , and most importantly trust in his players by ensuring they travelled first class and even refused to work( if I recall correctly) unless his players were paid.. He understood the importance of such and the need for players to be only focused on one thing and one thing only..football. So you see this convenient psychological nonsense that the TTFA (and most other athletic Federations use in this “cant-get away-from-colonial thinking place” we call Trinidad and Tobago, by using the words pride and honor as a means to possibly paying the players whenever or not paying them at all? Bull shit eh!! “Tallest” yuh moving slight Uncle Tommish eh..we watchin yuh!! And son of the soil or not, we will run yuh out of town if we realise that is your position and you do not defend the players when a payment situation occurs. And trust me…it will!!

  5. Thats the hall mark of a good coach team manager s are just glorifying servants to the coach the coach who looks after the intrest of his players and staff.

  6. So these Coaches get a health check ?

  7. In contrast, Beenhakker always ensured his players and staff were taken care of. He ensured that they flew business class at all times and he refuses to work until EVERYONE is paid–players and staff.
    Dennis would find things a lot easier if his players are paid on time. So that should also concern him.

  8. Why yuh hiding de length of de contract? What are de terms of de agreement? Dem tings does cause yuh tuh lose goodwill. And this thing about not conducting yuh business through de media. Ah hope is not no gag order business going on.

  9. You beat me to it Nigel! I hope he remembers he is the son of the soil talk when he stops getting paid. He should work for free if it’s such an honour.These players just gave up their Christmas to play for no money.

    Cudos for the TC for doing the right thing and resigning.

  10. Ah find Lawrence come with some outta timing talk about de players and money. He is obviously aware of the historical and current situation, but already telling dem “doh study it”. Well then dat should apply to de entire technical staff and administration. It should just be an honour. Steups!

    • To be fair he didn’t say it should “just” be an honor. While I agree with you they the players should get their due, and on time to boot. But I agree with his sentiment as well that representing your country on any platform is an honor. Unfortunately our administrators have a history of taking advantage of this sentiment for personal gain

    • Dat is de whole ting. I find dey does use dat as an excuse to mistreat de players. De mere fact that he chose to bring it up is worrisome. He coulda just talk about instilling pride and honour, and not even mention money.

    • Well I wasn’t surprised eh, because never forget that he was also an Army fella, and they are all brainwashed into defending our sweet country and always putting our sweet country first even if it is for free, why do you think that all the soldiers wasn’t part of the 2006 Soca Warriors suing meh uncle corrupted Jack Warner and his cronies for their well earned millions eh, so of course He will always tell them doh study the monies while himself and the rest of the corrupted TTFA will always be going to the banks smiling and I don’t really understand how he think that my players will want to represent our sweet country if he doesn’t make certain that they are always comfortable and happy eh, he really feels that our Soca Worries is the Army team or what eh, that when my soldiers use to open their mouths against the injustices eh, the Brigadaire will tell them, ‘Soldier it seems like you want to spend some days in the hole or what eh”, he will surely find our where barely grows and will shortly be getting a rude awakening. steeuuppss. Them really good yes.

    • Guys.. you know I’m brutally honest.. football is a job for these players.they MUST be paid. They’re not on £100,000 a week so can donate their match fees to charities.. it’s their job end of. Most of them look forward to their match fees. Will Dennis wok for free because he loves the game? NOPE!! I love football more than words can describe and I will not work for free except for a charity.. international football is NOT a charity. Poor ill advised comments but it does t surprise me in the least.

  11. Thanks Keith. I always believe you can learn something from being attentive and asking the right questions, even when the person isn’t answering them.

  12. ..Good article Lasaana. Separates the wheat from the chaff with well made points. SOMEBODY should tell the public what the term of Lawrence’s contract is. Transparency demands such and speaking in parables doesn’t make the grade. Again, good luck to the new technical staff. In my view the measure of progress will not be World Cup qualifying but the challenge for the Caribbean Cup. If we can’t win that we would still be stagnating..

  13. So since the technical committee regained on whos shoulder any blunder that happen now will blame fall on

  14. And he could lie, when he said that the first time that he made money was when he represented Wexham, so I guess when he represented the Army, and the other professional teams in our sweet country eh, he played for free ent. Them really good yes, hahahaha

  15. So now we will have a foreign base assistant Coach Sol Campbell who have Jamaican roots ent Mr. Live Wire.. Them really good yes.